The Bird Book by Chester A. Reed

While it is not practical to post an ENTIRE book, I am posting a glimpse of The Bird Book by Chester A. Reed. It is a public domain book shared as part of The Gutenberg Project. Here is the beginning and a section in the middle.  For more see the link at the bottom of this post.

Page 2
Male.                Female.
Young.

 

THE BIRD BOOK

ILLUSTRATING IN NATURAL COLORS
MORE THAN SEVEN HUNDRED
NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS;
ALSO SEVERAL HUNDRED
PHOTOGRAPHS OF THEIR
NESTS AND EGGS

BY

CHESTER A. REED, B. S.


Garden City            New York
DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY
1915

 

Copyright, 1914, by
CHARLES K. REED

All rights reserved, including that of
translation into foreign languages,
including the Scandinavian.


BARN OWL.


TOPOGRAPHY OF A BIRD.

Page 114

Whistling Swan.

179. Whooper Swan. Olor cygnus.

This European variety frequently is found in Greenland and formerly, regularly bred there. It nests in secluded swampy places in northern Europe.

180. Whistling Swan. Olor columbianus..

Range.–North America, breeding in the Arctic Circle, and wintering south to the Gulf of Mexico.

These birds, which are nearly five feet in length, are snow white with the exception of the black bill and feet. The Whistling Swan is distinguished from the next species by the presence of a small yellow spot on either side of the bill near its base. Their nests are made of a large mass of rubbish, weeds, grass, moss, feathers and occasionally a few sticks. It is generally placed in a somewhat marshy place in the neighborhood of some isolated pond. The eggs are of a greenish or brownish buff color, and number from three to six. Size 4.00 × 2.75. Data.–Mackenzie River. Nest a mass of weeds, sods and grass, lined with feathers; on an island near the mouth of the river. Collector, I. O. Stringer.

181. Trumpeter Swan. Olor buccinator.

Range.–Interior of North America from the Gulf of Mexico northward, breeding from northern United States northward.

This is a magnificent bird, about five and one-half feet in length. Its plumage is exactly like that of the preceding except that the bill is entirely black, and the nostril is located nearer the eye. Their nesting habits and eggs are the same as those of the Whistling Swan. While a few pairs may breed within the United States by far the greater number are found in the extreme north, from Hudson Bay to Alaska. The eggs may average a trifle larger than those of the preceding species.

Page 115

LAMELLIROSTRAL GRALLATORES. Order VI. ODONTOGLOSSÆ

FLAMINGOES. Family PHOENICOPTERIDAE

American Flamingo.
Roseate Spoonbill.

182. Flamingo. Phœnicopterus ruber.

Range.–Tropical and sub-tropical America on the Atlantic coasts, breeding in the Bahamas and West Indies; north to Florida and casually to the South Atlantic States.

These remarkable and grotesque appearing birds attain a length of about 48 inches. The plumage varies from white to a deep rosy red. It requires several years for them to attain the perfect adult plumage, and unlike most birds, they are in the best of plumage during the winter, the colors becoming faded as the nesting season approaches. The birds are especially noticeable because of the crooked, hollow, scoop-shaped bill, and the extremely long legs and neck. The feet are webbed, but more for the purpose of supporting them upon the mud flats than for use in swimming. The nests are usually built on a sandy point of an island; they are mounds of earth, grass and rubbish from one to two feet in height, the top being hollowed to receive the eggs. One or two eggs are a complete set. The shell is pale blue, but this is covered with a heavy white chalky deposit. The eggs are laid in June and July. Size 3.40 × 2.15.

READ MORE BELOW:

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Bird Book, by Chester A. Reed

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

Title: The Bird Book Illustrating in natural colors more than seven hundred North American birds; also several hundred photographs of their nests and eggs

Author: Chester A. Reed

Release Date: September 15, 2009 [EBook #30000]

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