Author Archive

For about ten years now, a family of peregrine falcons have made their home under the Interstate 5 Ship Canal Bridge. I think I want to go visit them, sometime soon. The Peregrine is renowned for its speed, reaching over 200 mph (322 km/h) during its characteristic hunting stoop (high speed dive), making it the fastest member of the animal kingdom. It is also the world’s most widespread bird of prey being found far and wide throughout the world. Both the English and scientific names of this species mean “wandering falcon”. Before the 1970’s DDT, the terrible pesticide, killed off many of the peregrine falcons—leaving it endangered. However, we finally wised up and banned DDT and since, with the help of a large-scale protection of nesting places, [&hellip

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There are so many birds abandoned, neglected, left to die. You can help by fostering or adopting a bird in your area or sponsoring a bird through many an organization helping birds. To learn more, you can go to the following websites: AvianWeb: This site gives different organizations in each of the U.S. states where you can adopt or foster a bird. The Avian Reconditioning Center You can adopt, or sponsor, a bird. They will send you information and updates on your bird. Avian Welfare Resource Center They do not actually adopt out birds but they have lots of useful information for adopting birds. Feathered Friends Forever This lovely organization started in 2006 — a parrot park even. They give information on how to adopt [&hellip

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I love birds! And I would love to go on an extended birding holiday seeing as many birds as I possibly can… a year, two? I would LOVE that… but alas it is not possible quite yet. So, the next best thing is to go through all the bird field guides I can and prepare for the day I can… read about all the lovely birds and choose the path I will one day take to see as many interesting birds as I can. So, in my journey towards a birding paradise holiday, I am reading (and reviewing) as many bird field guides as possible! =) I’ve been reading them for months but I thought I should share them with you as well. Why not? [&hellip

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Hello fellow bird lovers! I have another field guide review for you today. The Princeton Field Guide: Birds of the Middle East by Richard Porter & Simon Aspinall. This field guide is not unlike the other Princeton Field Guides1. It begins with a succinct but informative introduction, giving some insight into the area being covered in the guide, why certain birds were excluded, why some disputed birds were included. It includes a thorough illustrated diagram of bird topography (what a bird looks like, naming its various parts) and gives a good explanation of the voice (or call/song) of each bird. The authors even go into detail about how voice recordings lag far behind photographic identification of birds. The opening pages are not at all lengthy [&hellip

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Good morning fellow Nerd Birders! I have another excellent Princeton Field Guide review to share with you today, Birds of Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire by Bart De Boer, Eric Newton, and Robin Restall. This guide is the first and only of its kind for this area of the world, which makes it an important contribution to the birding community. It visually different, as you can see, from the other Princeton Field Guides I reviewed this week (North America and Greenland & Hawaii, New Zealand and the Central and West Pacific). It begins with an interesting introduction, giving us a feel for the area we are exploring with a map of the are as well as its succinct history. Then it goes into general flora and [&hellip

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Hello Nerd Birders! I have another wonderful guide book to tell you about. Like the Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific Princeton Guide, this guide, Birds of North America and Greenland by Norman Arlott is an excellent hand guide for birds in North America and Greenland. It features the same type of amazing illustrations of the various birds on the right side pages and the descriptions on the left. Each bird is identified by its multiple names, where it can be found, when it can be found there, its habitat, its specific calls/songs, distinguishing characteristics and a colorful illustration of each particular bird. Like the other books in this series, Birds of North America and Greenland is made with water [&hellip

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I think one can never have too many bird guides. Each one gives a unique perspective in helping identify various birds. We all have our preferences but knowing that some guides lend themselves to some aspects of bird identification, while others focus on other aspects or a broader view for beginners. It is good to have a variety to choose from. The Princeton Illustrated Checklists: Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific by Ber van Perlo is useful for not only people living in these places or visiting them but also in giving a sneak peak into the birds some of us may never see. I learned of a few new birds I had never heard of before reading this book. [&hellip

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THIS IS SO EXCITING!!!! Whilst sharing a crow related animation video, I came across a brilliant and creative art project: The Bird Wall: A Ceramic Aviary, hatched up as a final semester project by three architecture students (Kevin, Lawrence and Alex) at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. The assignment was to design a performative skin system12) . They decided to make a bird wall, a ceramic aviary. Ingenious, right? The plan was to make a wall out of ceramic tiles (which they refer to as modules) that serve as bird houses, bird baths, perches and feeding spots for the local birds. From concept to actualization, these three smart birds created a ceramic aviary with their own hands and minds and a [&hellip

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  The International Migratory Bird Day is on May 12th this year. I won’t try to paraphrase or rewrite something to explain what this day is all about. I will just let you read from their website,1 What is International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD)? IMBD celebrates and brings attention to one of the most important and spectacular events in the Americas – bird migration.  Bird Day is celebrated in Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean.   When is International Migratory Bird Day?? IMBD officially takes place on the second Saturday in May in the U.S. and Canada and in October in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean each year. But we recognize that this date doesn’t work [&hellip

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