Author Archive

Today, I choose the Brewer’s Blackbird for the bird of the day (or what is seemingly the bird of the week) because my friend saw some in the parking lot of Target and took a picture on her cell phone for me. =) The picture quality is poor because it is a cell phone and so… here is a photograph I found on the internet: As with most birds the female is less colorful than the male. The female is dull brown and the male is iridescent black (black with a purplish/bluish tint). The female is smaller than the male. We see them in parking lots frequently, so they must have adapted well to suburban life. They are considered in the least conservationist concern category [&hellip

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Ha-ha-ha-ha-hahahahaha… woody woodpecker was fashioned after today’s bird, the Pileated Woodpecker. He’s sooooo cute. It is about the size of the crow which is actually large for a woodpecker. I wouldn’t have thought they’d be so small really. I don’t know why. Maybe I watched too many cartoons growing up and not enough birds in the trees. These woodpeckers peck at the wood to get sap and ants. Interestingly enough, they peck square holes in the trees. They peck so hard, they can break smaller trees. And the holes they peck into trees often become homes for smaller birds. The Pileated Woodpecker likes my neck of the woods, the Pacific Northwest, lucky me! =) Listen to the pileated woodpecker here (Source: Cornell Lab of Ornithology). [&hellip

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The Mallard is the most common duck seen in the United States. The males are more colorful than the females and this is so the female can choose from the males when it comes to mating. She should have a variety afterall. =) The Mallard (and the Muscovy Duck)1 are believed to be the ancestors of all domestic ducks. They are hardy birds able to adapt to almost anything and they eat a little bit of everything, so it seems. This adaptability to both environment and diet helps them survive and thrive, even when people are involved. I found their courting/mating ritual quite entertaining, it is not unlike that of the humans… “During courtship, three or more males may display simultaneously, shaking heads and tails, [&hellip

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Today’s bird is going to be the Barred Owl. Ask me why? Come on…ask me! Ask me why? BECAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE I have pictures of it. Not pictures that are creative commons. Not pictures I bought. Not pictures from postcard but actual live in-person pictures of the Barred Owl in the “Wetland Mitigation” in Redmond, WA. It is a small reserve of land between the Microsoft campus and an apartment complex. I am sooooo lucky to know someone who lives in this complex and works at Microsoft who is soooooo lucky to be able to walk through this beautiful area and see the coolest birds like this Barred Owl. And for the low, low price of NOTHING I am going to share this walk with you, the [&hellip

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I was searching around at bird videos and found this one. I remembered how much I love these little blue-footed boobies. A friend of mine introduced me to them and I’ve loved them ever since. They are adorable. I love the way they dance about showing off their feet. I will post some information I found about them. Again, I’ll synthesize it sometime, I hope! Here is what I found: Blue-footed boobies are aptly named, and males take great pride in their fabulous feet. During mating rituals, male birds show off their feet to prospective mates with a high-stepping strut. The bluer the feet, the more attractive the mate. These boobies live off the western coasts of Central and South America. The Galápagos Islands population [&hellip

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The Laughing Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae, is an Australian carnivorous bird in the Kingfisher family. This species of kookaburra is well known for its laughing call. Taxonomy The Laughing Kookaburra was first described by French naturalist Johann Hermann in 1783, its specific epithet novaeguineae refers to New Guinea. For many years it was known as Dacelo gigas. Previously known as the Laughing Jackass it is now best known by its aboriginal name. Distribution It is found throughout eastern Australia, and has been introduced into the south-west corner of Western Australia, Tasmania, Flinders Island, Kangaroo Island. Furthermore, some were also introduced into New Zealand between 1866 and 1880, but only those liberated on Kawau Island by Sir George Grey survived. Descendants are still found there today. Description [&hellip

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Ok, this is not terribly organized (I have some other things to take care of today) but I will come back to it. Here is what I found on the Belted Kingfisher thus far. A video. Visual Resources for Ornithology — Gallery of Belted Kingfishers. Cornell Lab of Ornithology — All About Birds — Belted Kingfisher. What a belted kingfisher sounds like — click here — from Cornell Lab of Ornithology. More information about the Belted Kingfisher. And…I found that the Belted Kingfisher is on the $5 Canadian note (printed in 1986)

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