Author Archive

  “You cannot prevent the birds of sadness from passing over your head, but you can prevent their making a nest in your hair” — Chinese Proverb What an interesting snippet words, Birds of sadness. It conjures up many mental pictures for me and thoughts about birds and emotions and bird’s emotions. Researchers have found that birds do have emotions! They can feel sadness, they can feel anger. The stories of the crow researcher, John Marzluff, at the University of Washington in Seattle who did the research on facial recognition with crows. He had students wear masks and capture, band and set free crows. When the students wore the masks again — even many months after — the crows remembered and had communicated with other [&hellip

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Why a book review on a field guide to Dinosaurs on a bird-related site? Because birds are direct descendants of dinosaurs and some species are actually living dinosaurs! The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs by Gregory S. Paul is brilliant! It is the very first and most comprehensive field guide to dinosaurs. This book amazed me with its intricate drawings, vast research, the sheer number of dinosaurs now discovered! This is definitely not the limited information we had as children about dinosaurs. I remember learning about the couple of dozen of types of dinosaurs in elementary school and thinking they were so fascinating. What I learned back then pales in comparison to what I learned from this book. The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs is [&hellip

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The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds by Richard Crossley is a remarkable bird guide indeed. This is the first time I have used a Crossley Guide and it is just simply wonderful in its design. It is unique in its approach to helping people identify birds, no matter what level of birder you are from beginner to expert, you will find this guide useful. While most bird field guides use the majority of space to give information detailing the specific physical traits of each bird, they often have one or two photographs of each bird. They rely heavily on detailed physical description for identification. This is good but it is not always easy to correctly identify birds this way, particularly when you are just learning to [&hellip

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CONVERSATION WITH RICHARD CROSSLEY and SNEAK PEEK OF THE CROSSLEY ID GUIDE: EASTERN BIRDS We invite you to join a stunning online visual conversation with acclaimed photographer and birder Richard Crossley. He’ll share a sneak preview of his new book, The Crossley ID Guide:  Eastern Birds, published by Princeton University Press.  The book is already getting rave reviews (Audubon Magazine’s Wayne Mones quips, “So what’s so different about The Crossley ID Guide? Everything.”). Richard’s vision was to take birding into the 21st-century by creating a bird guide that shows birds the way they are seen in real life. Instead of offering up the usual single ‘flat’ bird picture, he’s created engaging multi-dimensional scenes with every detail in focus to show a wide range of views [&hellip

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We have officially moved. We are no longer parked at birdy on my window dot com… welcome to our new home Nerdbirder.com! With this move I have decided to make some changes to make the site more exciting and interesting. One change is the theme (i.e. style and logo). My wonderful friend Christopher drew the new logo for me. Thank you Christopher! Now to making this site worth reading and doing. Suggestions are welcome. It will be exciting to see the organic process of change for nerdbirder.com. I hope all of you will be part of the process by writing, commenting, giving suggestions, telling me what you like and do not like. =) Together, we can make this a positive change!

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We have officially moved from Birdyonmywindow dot com to Nerdbirder dot com. I will be changing the logo and perhaps the entire site. I love birds and I think the site has been dragging for awhile. It is time to give it some pep. =) This process will be organic and there is no set deadline. I will continue to work on it. A work in progress. I will be deleting some old posts. Revising some. And mostly moving forward! If you have ideas, let me know. =)

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norman’s goopybird, originally uploaded by j l t. Alas, our name has been sold and we are moving to http://www.nerdbirder.com within the week. Please update your links and bookmarks! We will look at this as a positive new beginning to kick off the new year! And perhaps we can do some positive changes on the site as well. See you at Nerdbirder.com!

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While it should have occurred to me sooner, a very interesting bird is the Seahawk more commonly known as the Osprey. Being from the beautiful state of Washington, I am a proud Seahawk fan but an ignorant one. I didn’t know until recently that a Seahawk was an osprey. Ospreys are very large birds of prey. They often have wingspans of 4 to 6 feet wide!!! That is a big bird. Apparently the Seattle Seahawks were given their name by a public vote, the name was suggested by a high school in Gig Harbor. This isn’t your average bird and apparently they don’t live in your average nest. The nest of an Osprey can weigh up to 250 pounds! What a nest! The osprey return [&hellip

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