Author Archive

THE PEACOCK’S COUSIN ONG, long ago in the days of wise King Solomon, the Crow and the Pheasant were the best of friends, and were always seen going about together, wing in wing. Now the Pheasant was the Peacock’s own cousin,—a great honor, many thought, for the Peacock was the most gorgeous of all the birds. But it was not altogether pleasant for the Pheasant, because at that time he wore such plain and shabby old garments that his proud relative was ashamed of him, and did not like to be reminded that they were of the same family. When the Peacock went strutting about with his wonderful tail spread fan-wise, and with his vain little eyes peering to see who might be admiring his [&hellip

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HOW THE BLUEBIRD CROSSED F course every one knows that the Bluebird was made from a piece of the azure sky itself. One has only to match his wonderful color against the April heaven to be sure of that. Therefore the little Bluebird was especially dear to the Spirit of the sky, the Father in Heaven. One day this venturesome little bird started out upon a long journey across the wide Pacific Ocean toward this New World which neither Columbus nor any other man had yet discovered. Under him tossed the wide, wide sea, rolling for miles in every direction, with no land visible anywhere on which a little bird might rest his foot. For this was also before there were any islands in all [&hellip

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THE WREN WHO BROUGHT FIRE ENTURIES and centuries ago, when men were first made, there was no such thing as fire known in all the world. Folk had no fire with which to cook their food, and so they were obliged to eat it raw; which was very unpleasant, as you may imagine! There were no cheery fireplaces about which to sit and tell stories, or make candy or pop corn. There was no light in the darkness at night except the sun and moon and stars. There were not even candles in those days, to say nothing of gas lamps or electric lights. It is strange to think of such a world where even the grown folks, like the children and the birds, had [&hellip

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HALCYONE HE story of the first Kingfisher is a sad one, and you need not read it unless for a very little while you wish to feel sorry. Long, long ago when the world was new, there lived a beautiful princess named Halcyone. She was the daughter of old Æolus, King of the Winds, and lived with him on his happy island, where it was his chief business to keep in order the four boisterous brothers, Boreas, the North Wind, Zephyrus, the West Wind, Auster, the South Wind, and Eurus, the East Wind. Sometimes, indeed, Æolus had a hard time of it; for the Winds would escape from his control and rush out upon the sea for their terrible games, which were sure to bring [&hellip

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KING OF THE BIRDS NCE upon a time, when the world was very new and when the birds had just learned from Mother Magpie how to build their nests, some one said, “We ought to have a king. Oh, we need a king of the birds very much!” For you see, already in the Garden of Birds trouble had begun. There were disputes every morning as to which was the earliest bird who was entitled to the worm. There were quarrels over the best places for nest-building and over the fattest bug or beetle; and there was no one to settle these difficulties. Moreover, the robber birds were growing too bold, and there was no one to rule and punish them. There was no doubt [&hellip

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  THE GORGEOUS GOLDFINCH HE Goldfinch who lives in Europe is one of the gaudiest of the little feathered brothers. He is a very Joseph of birds in his coat of many colors, and folk often wonder how he came to have feathers so much more gorgeous than his kindred. But after you have read this tale you will wonder no longer. You must know that when the Father first made all the birds they were dressed alike in plumage of sober gray. But this dull uniform pleased Him no more than it did the birds themselves, who begged that they might wear each the particular style which was most becoming, and by which they could be recognized afar. So the Father called the birds [&hellip

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MOTHER MAGPIE’S KINDERGARTEN ID you ever notice how different are the nests which the birds build in springtime, in tree or bush or sandy bank or hidden in the grass? Some are wonderfully wrought, pretty little homes for birdikins. But others are clumsy, and carelessly fastened to the bough, most unsafe cradles for the feathered baby on the treetop. Sometimes after a heavy wind you find on the ground under the nest poor little broken eggs which rolled out and lost their chance of turning into birds with safe, safe wings of their own. Now such sad things as this happen because in their youth the lazy father and mother birds did not learn their lesson when Mother Magpie had her class in nest-making. The [&hellip

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Mr. Stork and Miss Heron (page 178) The Curious Book of Birds By Abbie Farwell Brown With Illustrations By E. Boyd Smith BOSTON AND NEW YORK HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY The Riverside Press, Cambridge 1903 Published October, 1903. There are many books written nowadays which will tell you about birds as folk of the twentieth century see them. They describe carefully the singer’s house, his habits, the number of his little wife’s eggs, and the color of every tiny feather on her pretty wings. But these books tell you nothing at all about bird-history; about what birds have meant to all the generations of men, women, and children since the world began. You would think, to read the words of the bird-book men, that they [&hellip

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The Illustrated Alphabet of Birds, by Unknown     The Baldwin Library University of Florida       THE ILLUSTRATED ALPHABET OF BIRDS     BOSTON WM. CROSBY & H.P. NICHOLS. 1851.      A     a THE AUK A is an Auk, Of the Artic sea, He lives on the ice, Where the winds blow free.     B     b THE BLUE BIRD. B is a Blue Bird. In early spring, How sweet his songs Through the forest ring.     C    c THE CONDOR. C is a Condor, On the Andes’ height, He plumes his wings For a lofty flight.     D     d THE DUCK. D is a Duck. Of the canvas back sort, To shoot at a flock Is considered fine sport.   [&hellip

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While it is not practical to post an ENTIRE book, I am posting a glimpse of The Bird Book by Chester A. Reed. It is a public domain book shared as part of The Gutenberg Project. Here is the beginning and a section in the middle.  For more see the link at the bottom of this post. Page 2 Male.                Female. Young.   THE BIRD BOOK ILLUSTRATING IN NATURAL COLORS MORE THAN SEVEN HUNDRED NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS; ALSO SEVERAL HUNDRED PHOTOGRAPHS OF THEIR NESTS AND EGGS BY CHESTER A. REED, B. S. Garden City            New York DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY 1915   Copyright, 1914, by CHARLES K. REED All rights reserved, including that of translation into foreign languages, including the Scandinavian. BARN OWL. TOPOGRAPHY OF A BIRD. [&hellip

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