Author Archive

by: Dries Cronje The nice thing about bird photography is that it can happen anywhere on our beautiful globe. The not so nice thing is that birds are small or shy, and you need to be able to get close enough with your equipment. In this article, we will be looking at the ideal equipment for bird photography. We will also be having a quick look at how to use this equipment. Camera body We live in the world of digital photography, and therefore we will only be discussing digital camera bodies. I am also a really big Canon fan, so I will talk Canon, and you can translate it to other manufacturers if you need to. You will need a decent camera body that [&hellip

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by: Janeth Duque Many people enjoy the dulcet sounds of birds singing and chirping in their yards. Birds are beautiful to look at, and they provide many with an appreciation for nature. There are many benefits associated with attracting birds to the landscape, but in order to experience these benefits, the birds first need to be attracted. It is possible to attract birds to your property by following a few simple design principles, and by choosing plants for your landscape that naturally attract birds. Birdfeeders are old staples for those who wish to see birds in their yards. When using feeders, they should be placed conveniently, and they should also be large enough to hold two to three days’ worth of food. Placing birdfeeders in [&hellip

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by: Laura Gray Bird watching has become the fastest growing recreational activity in the U.S. It’s no secret that about fifty million Americans enjoy bird watching every year, and why not? Birds are beautiful creatures and there are so many different kinds of birds, that you’ll never lack a different view. You also get a magnificent chance to commune with nature. It’s also relaxing and can turn into a wonderful past time that takes you into your own back yard. You can sit at your kitchen table and view the birds that inhabit your backyard, while sipping a cup of coffee. You can also build your very own bird habitat, which can lead to years of learning and recreation. There are bird watching trails and [&hellip

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by: Jo Williams Before starting this article about building a squirrel proof bird feeder, let me ask you this question, what’s with squirrels? We all know that watching these creatures roaming around the backyard lawn can be truly delightful. But they can also cause destruction to your birdfeeders and scare the birds away. Most squirrels like the foods intended for the birds. During winter, indomitable homeowners and squirrels are in a battle over bird food in numerous backyards. Other animals, like raccoons, steal bird food, but more often squirrels raid bird feeders. Ignoring the extremes of winter season, nothing beats the squirrel in persistently achieving its goal, they have enough agility and dexterity to be able to climb onto any surface that birds could reach, [&hellip

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by: Felix Zhucha Many people have switched from mere bird watching to a more exciting hobby of photographing birds.The pleasure of bird watching, and the capability of preserving the visual image that brought that pleasure is possible only with photography.Therefore, bird watching and bird photography complement each other. You don’t need to be an experienced birder to enjoy photographing birds,but you need to know your subjects – study birds and know their biology,travel patterns,habits, and behavior. The best way to start photographing birds is to begin in your backyard with subjects that are easily accessible.To attract birds – set up a feeding station in your backyard. Choose some location with a non-distracting background. Set up a blind close to the feeder and shoot.Or,you can shoot [&hellip

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by: Gary Machado It’s quiet, now. Gone is the constant chatter, whistles and meowing sounds as you jump from branch to branch safeguarding your territory against all trespassers. Gone too is the uniformally gray body with the black cap and tail feathers, with just a smidgen of rust coloration under the tail coverts, that allows you to blend in with your natural habitat of dense undergrowth and thickets. They call you a skulker, a bird hard to see in the dense underbrush. Usually heard but not seen. Definitely NOT a backyard bird. Except in my backyard. Maybe it’s because my back yard is filled with trees and dense underbrush along the rear and side fences. Or maybe it’s because there is a wooded area of [&hellip

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by: Jan Linden The following is a several basic tips we have learnt along the way, we hope that they may assist you with your photography.I tried to describe all the things more simple. General: Bad or lackluster photos are caused from laziness. Unfortunately, too many photographers, amateurs and professionals, will approach a photo assignment with a pre-conceived notion of attack – mostly from “history of style” and wanting to play it safe. Rarely, will the photographer step back, put down the camera and size up the assignment before proceeding. Instead, many of us will execute the photo from the angle we initially approached the subject, never thinking to study the subject and its environment first. Hold It Steady: A problem with many photographs is [&hellip

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by: Bruce Underwood Sure you can buy wild bird food, sometimes for BIG $’s, but there are hundreds of family handed-down homemade recipes for you to make on your own.Many of these recipes include ingredients you will have laying around the house. This saves you BIG $’s. Most birds will eat many things. The recipe(s) we have collected for each bird are some of their preferred food selections. Here are two examples: Oriole There are 2 very easy recipes for Orioles. Great project for 3 year old or older – with supervision Complexity – Easy Time to Complete – 10 minutes Main Ingredient – An Orange or Jelly Needed – Orange or Jelly Step 1 – This is one of the easiest of all! All [&hellip

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Another fantastic shot by Mark Cummins! Here is what he had to say about the photograph: nerdbirder For my fellow geeks: Swan Geese are also known as African or Chinese Geese (Anser cygnoides). Notwithstanding the name, these geese are not from Africa. They originate from China and were imported into the USA in the 19th century. Exhibition Africans or Swan Geese are impressive birds, ganders standing one meter tall. Hand-raised geese can become very confiding. There is a great deal of variation in weight. Some varieties are quite small, reaching only 16-20 lbs, while others may weigh as much as 26 lbs. The Swan Goose, Anser cygnoides, is a large goose with a natural breeding range in Mongolia and eastern Russia. It is migratory and [&hellip

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This photograph was taken by Mark Cummins who also wrote the following: Geeky stuff Many people call this bird the “Hedge Sparrow” – presumably because it’s similar in colouring to a sparrow – being mainly brown and grey – and a similar size. The “hedge” bit must come from its habit of hanging around the bottoms of hedges looking for insects. Its proper scientific name is Prunella modularis. But it was introduced to me as the dunnock, and that’s what I’ve always known it as. It was also pointed out to me that you could tell it from the sparrow straight away by its thin beak. It isn’t related to sparrows at all. The best name it has though is “shufflewing” – an old country [&hellip

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