We decided to try putting out peanuts without shells instead of the normal with shells. The crows came and were as happy as ever, even more raucous actually. They were cawing up a storm!! Maybe that was a thank you to us. =) Less work. They gobbled them and lingered a lot longer today than usual. They were eating and socializing. It was fun to watch. And we got two new visitors today; the Stellar Jay and *I think* a Brewer’s Blackbird. I think it had to have been the new food. These two birds also like seeds but I think the feeder is too small for them to eat from. The Brewer’s Blackbird did try to eat from it but was frightened away when [&hellip

Read More...

Chickadees

By

January 24, 2009BirdsNo comments

These little cuties come to the back porch to eat the black oil sunflower seeds in the new feeder. YAY for new birds! =) (Don’t worry, we are still feed the crows!) There are two types here: the Black-Capped Chickadees and Chestnut-Backed Chickadees. Aren’t they adorable? “Mixed flocks stay together because the chickadees call out whenever they find a good source of food. This calling out forms cohesion for the group, allowing the other birds to find food more efficiently. When flocking, Black-capped Chickadees soon establish a rigid social hierarchy.”1 They do sing but I haven’t had the pleasure of them hearing them. =( I will soon, I hope. Primarily they are insectivores but they do like seeds and berries as well. We know they [&hellip

Read More...

Saxicola torquata Originally uploaded by Mark Cummins This is one of the Old World flycatchers. They live in trees and like to eat insects. Also known as, Saxicola torquata or the Common Stonechat. I think this must be a female because it is brown. The male is typically black with white on the belly and a little tuft of rusty colored feathers on the collar. They are native to South Africa, Senegal, Ethiopia, the mountains of southwest Arabia and on Madagascar and Grand Comoro Island. Thanks to Mark for the wonderful photograph. =)

Read More...

Ringed Teal (Callonetta leucophrys) Originally uploaded by Mark Cummins About: Male and female different; male with top of head and back of neck black; sides of head grayish-brown; beak, rump, and tail black; back is chestnut sides are gray; female is dark brown on head, neck, and back; there is a white bar above the eye an the cheeks are white; chests and sides are mottled brown. Nest Site: Holes in trees. Initial Nest: During spring-summer of first year. When: Probably September to December, but possibly as late as February in some locals. Clutch Size: 5 to 8 eggs Incubation: Approximately 23 days

Read More...

Rufus Whistling Tree Duck Originally uploaded by Mark Cummins ufus Whistling Tree Duck (Dendrocygna bicolor) Rufus whistling tree ducks are mostly vegetarian. They eat grasses, bulbs, rushes, seeds, fruit and especially rice. They forage by dabbling, with head immersed or by upending. Occasionally they will dive for food. The rufus whistling tree ducks are mainly nocturnal. During the day they rest, often in large flocks on the water shore. They build their nests amongst vegetation making a high mound of plant material which they sometimes line with down. (No work needed! The photographer did it for me! Yay! Thanks Mark!)

Read More...

…A spiffy new handmade, quirky bird wallet (See pictures below)… CONTEST….CONTEST….PRIZE….PRIZE….CONTEST….CONTEST….PRIZE…PRIZE… We have fallen in love with an artist on Etsy, Rosybird. She makes the most adorable birdy items ever! We want to spread the good cheer onto you, the readers. We would love to give everyone a new wallet from Rosybird but since we haven’t yet discovered the money tree seed, we decided to share in another very creative manner. We want to inspire you and give away this most wonderful wallet to one lucky person. And all you have to do is send us an original bird art piece: painting, drawing, original graphic, paper mache’ (decoupage for you fancier folks), sketch, Lego model, glass, cardboard cutout of a bird…the sky is the limit… [&hellip

Read More...

Due to inconsistent posting and lack of time, I regret to inform you, we will no longer be doing “Bird of the Day” but rather we will focus on “Bird of the Week”. =) This is more doable and I can really research each bird. More fun, more knowledge, more understanding. And, if you the readers want contribute by researching a bird, I would love to post it here. Simply e-mail me

Read More...

Red-tailed black cockatoo Originally uploaded by dark orange The bird of the day today is the Red-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii). It is also known as Banksian- or Bank’s Black Cockatoo. It is found in Australia, those Australians, they get to see all the cool and rare birds. =) This is a big bird folks, about 24 inches LONG! Wow, two feet of bird. Despite its size, this very noisy bird prefers to eat mostly Eucalyptus seeds. A bird after my own heart. =) They can live up to or even longer than 50 years! Wow, a long-living, seed-eating bird. Nice. Growing up, my grandmother often had cockatoos but hers were white with yellow or red tufts. These are the more common type of cockatoo [&hellip

Read More...

Eastern Rosella Originally uploaded by ianmichaelthomas Today’s bird of the day is the Eastern Rosella, also known as Platycercus eximius. It is native to Australia and Tasmania but now is also found in New Zealand. I read you can have this bird as a pet but it is not very “cuddly”. Hahahaha. This bird photograph is from flickr user ianmichaelthomas. Here is what he had to say about this photograph (direct copy and paste): Another wild and free Australian native parrot! Australia can rightly be called the land of parrots. There are about 80 species in Australia. Eastern Rosella Another iconic Australian native parrot, the Eastern Rosella is spectacularly coloured, and similar in size to the Crimson rosella. Eastern rosellas are the mascot/emblem of Aussie [&hellip

Read More...

Stellar’s Jay Originally uploaded by Life of David The Stellar Jay, another bird found locally, is today’s bird of the day. It’s scientific name is Cyanocitta stelleri. It is common throughout the U.S. but I love it. I like to look at them. They are interesting and beautiful. They like seeds, nuts, berries, fruit, invertebrates, eggs, other bird’s nestlings (GASP!), acorns, conifer seeds and other things like them. It will join you for a picnic, if you bring the right food. You can read more about the Stellar Jay, even hear its call, here. http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Stellers_Jay.html

Read More...