GBH Originally uploaded by sproutter The Great Blue Heron…one of my favorite birds, albeit I have so many. This bird is so beautiful. I remember the first time I seen one. I was mesmerized by it and ever since, I’ve been on the lookout for it whenever I am near its habitat. Also known as Ardea herodias in the scientific world, this bird is the largest heron in North America. It can be from 36 to 55 inches from head to tail and has a wingspan of 66 to 79 inches! Many inches of awesome. =) It has a scratchy, throaty call. You can hear it here. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Great_Blue_Heron.ogg It eats small fish mostly but it will also eat shellfish, insects, rodents, amphibians (such as frogs), [&hellip

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American Robin (male) Originally uploaded by Wayne Weber The bird of the day today is the American Robin, (Turdus migratorius), what a strange scientific name. =/ It is found all over the U.S. and happens to be the state bird of three states (Michigan, Connecticut and Wisconsin)! I think it has earned that popularity. It is an attractive, social bird that sings loud and clear. =) You can hear it here. American Robins likes= to eat worms, earthworms in particular which ironically is reflected in the collective noun for American Robins: a worm of Robins. They also enjoy insects, fruits and berries. The American Robin lives everywhere in the U.S. — lawns, woodlands, shrubs, trees, even sheltered windowsills. It winters in moist woodlands, suburbs and [&hellip

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Bewick’s Wren Originally uploaded by sproutter Another birdy found in Washington State, the Bewick’s Wren, (Thryomanes bewickii). I read this species is the only one in the category Thryomanes and that there is a subspecies called the Seattle Wren. I think you can guess what tomorrow’s bird of the day will be… =) It is a small bird who likes to live in urban areas, near houses and once found throughout the eastern part of the U.S., it is mostly located in the western part now. They speculate this is because of the tricky ways of the House Wren. I seen one of these eating something near the peanuts I fed the crows this morning. It is about 5 inches and likes spiders and insects. [&hellip

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American Avocet Originally uploaded by Wayne Weber I did a search for bird of Washington State and found this bird, the American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana). It is found around marshes, beaches, ponds, and shallow lakes. It gets to be about 18 inches tall, about the size of a toddler. =) Straight from Cornell Lab of Ornithology, here are some cool facts about the American Avocet: # In response to predators, the American Avocet sometimes issues a series of call notes that gradually changes pitch, simulating the Doppler effect and thus making its approach seem faster than it actually is. # Nesting American Avocets aggressively attack predators, sometimes physically striking Northern Harriers or Common Ravens. # A female American Avocet may lay one to four eggs [&hellip

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White Breasted Nuthatch Originally uploaded by iceberg_ca White Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) was an adorable bird we came across in our search for Anna’s hummingbird. In the photograph we looked at it was upside down. So cute! The White-breasted nuthatch eats insects out of tree trunks and branches, as well as seeds, acorns and hickory nuts. They live in trees, in small holes. It is about 5-6 inches long with a wingspan of 8-11 inches and weighs in at about 1/2 to 1 ounce. There are 9 subspecies of the White Breasted Nuthatch. One of these subspecies, the Sitta carolinensis aculeata, are found in Washington State! YAY!

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Anna’s Hummingbird Originally uploaded by lselman Calypte anna, also known as Anna’s Hummingbird, flew into the bird of the day by flying into the tree right by my railing while we were feeding the crows the other day. We spent about an hour identifying it and now we know for certain, it was an Anna’s Hummingbird. How adorable it is… and this photograph is an amazing shot of a mom feeding her chick. They are sweet. Anna’s hummingbird is known as a medium sized hummingbird at about 4 inches long with a wingspan of 5 inches and only weighing between 0.11 and 0.21 ounces! This is a tiny little bird but apparently not so tiny in comparison to other hummingbirds. I got the following cool [&hellip

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Poecile sclateri. Originally uploaded by Pablo Lèautaud. I found the Mexican Chickadee (Poecile sclateri) in my National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Birds of North America. I was looking for a hummingbird we wanted to identify. We feed some crows everyday and when we put out the peanuts for them the other day we noticed a hummingbird in the tree near our railing. This was very exciting for us! We may be getting a hummingbird feeder soon! YAY! =) Ok, back to the Mexican Chickadee. While flipping through the book I passed by it and wrote it down. I just had to include it as today’s bird of the day because it is a puff ball. It is a songbird. YAY for songbirds! They are [&hellip

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Grosbeak the Rose-Breasted type Originally uploaded by ut.law97 The Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) is the bird of the day! =) I read about him in the book, A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders And Their Quest To See It All by Luke Dempsey. It prefers to live in “open deciduous woods” and can be found in Canada and the Eastern part of the United States. It has more recently began to extend its range towards the west because of “misguided fire prevention policies which have created habitat on the Great Plains.” The Rose breasted Grosbeak eats insects, seeds and berries. It prefers a thinner nest, so thin you can often see through the nest to the eggs from below it. (Cornell Lab of Ornithology) [&hellip

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Coruja-buraqueira (Speotyto cunicularia) – Burrowing Owl Originally uploaded by Flávio Cruvinel Brandão Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) The Burrowing Owl is the Bird-of-the-day today! It is technically known as the Athene cunicularia. It gets its name for its burrowing practices, it lives in underground burrows rather than in trees. It can be found in grasslands, rangelands, agricultural areas, deserts or any other dry, open area with low vegetation. They nest and roost in burrows, such as those excavated by prairie dogs. Unlike most owls, burrowing owls are often active during the day, although they tend to avoid the mid-day heat. Most hunting is still done from dusk until dawn, when their owl apomorphies are most advantageous.1 They typical Burrowing Owl lives to be at least 9 [&hellip

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