Red-Shouldered Hawk Originally uploaded by Nikographer [Jon] [away] The bird for today is the Red-Shouldered Hawk, also known as Buteo lineatus. It lives in the forest, particularly near water. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology it is likely the most vocal hawk. You can hear it here. http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Red-shouldered_Hawk_dtl.html#sound An interesting fact or two by Cornell Lab of Ornithology about the Red-Shouldered Hawk: * Although the American Crow often mobs the Red-shouldered Hawk, sometimes the relationship is not so one-sided. They may chase each other and try to steal food from each other. They may also both attack a Great Horned Owl and join forces to chase the owl out of the hawk’s territory. * By the time they are five days old, nestling Red-shouldered [&hellip

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Common Grackle Originally uploaded by Ken Blackwell The Common Grackle, Quiscalus quiscula, is today’s bird of the day. Hurray. Aren’t they pretty little birds? I found the following on Wikipedia about this bird: The breeding habitat is open and semi-open areas across North America east of the Rocky Mountains. The nest is a well-concealed cup in dense trees (particularly pine) or shrubs, usually near water; sometimes, the Common Grackle will nest in cavities or in man-made structures. It often nests in colonies, some being quite large. This bird is a permanent resident in much of its range. Northern birds migrate in flocks to the southeastern United States. The Common Grackle forages on the ground, in shallow water or in shrubs; it will steal food from [&hellip

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A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders and Their Quest To See It All by Luke Dempsey I thought it would be worth the time if I started to do some informal book reviews on the bird-related books I read. =) I will start with my most recent, A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders and Their Quest To See It All by Luke Dempsey. I have taken many a bird from this book to make a daily bird. It mentions many birds and even gives a little detail about some of them. This book is a quick, fun read. It details how the author, Luke Dempsey, begins his love affair with birds and how it progesses. He is very personable and tells the story [&hellip

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The White-billed crow can only be found in central part of the Solomon Islands. They are officially called Corvus woodfordi. It is a stocky short bird who prefers the forest. It has a squared off tail and a big head. It has a distinct deep and curved pale ivory colored bill with a darker tip, resembling the coloring of wing tip shoes to me. =) Overall it is glossy black with a purplish-green gloss to the head and purple gloss to the rest of it. The iris of the White-Billed Crow is pale gray or white and the legs and feet are black. The White-billed Crow lives in small families and together they look for insects and fruit to eat. There is not a lot [&hellip

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Bald Eagle – Alaska Originally uploaded by Creativity+ Timothy K Hamilton A bird of prey. The National Bird of the United States of America. I chose the bald eagle for today’s bird of the day because it is the 2008 election day. We MUST move forward from the past eight years and today will be the start of this new journey. If you live inside the U.S. and are a citizen, please DO NOT FORGET TO VOTE. It is very important. The Bald Eagle is now off the endangered list, YAY! It is a big bird. It is 28-42 inches in length with a wingspan of 66-96 inches, 5 feet 5 inches to 8 feet wide! WOW! Impressive. It weighs in at about 6 1/2 [&hellip

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Eurasian Black Vulture – Aegypius monachus Originally uploaded by HGHjim The black vulture is near threatened. Sheesh. Doesn’t it seem like too many birds are near threatened or threatened? It is sad. =( It is also known as the Aegypius monachus, the Eurasian Black Vulture, the Monk Vulture and the Cinereous Vulture. They are known as Old World Vultures. I’ve now learned that there are two types of vultures: Old World and New World. All vultures are known not to have feathers on their head area in order to not get bloody and messy while eating the dead carcasses of animals they feed upon. Both types of Vultures feed on dead animals. Both hunt. Both have the bald heads and strong beaks. How are they [&hellip

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Pied Wagtail Originally uploaded by Peter Herring This little birdy is an adorable subspecies of the White Wagtail! He has lots of energy and hops about. He also wags his tail like he’s had too much coffee. How cuteeeeeeeee! An energetic little birdy. They eat insects and can be found all year round throughout Great Britain and Ireland can be found in Spain and North Africa in the winter. They live in large roosts almost everywhere in the UK. You can even find them in town squares. =) Interesting. They are not endangered at all. They are “common”. YAY for common birds! Listen to its song here

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Henslow’s Sparrow by John K. Cassady Originally uploaded by jcassady The little birdies are on near threatened status. =( How sad. They live in colonies in grasslands in Southern Canada and the Northeastern United States. They eat insects and seeds. Henslow’s sparrows only breed in habitats that are a number of years post fire or disturbance. However, the habitat at a site may be optimal for the species for only a few years before it becomes too dense and the birds will abandon the site unless it is burned or mowed again (Audubon). For more information click here. You can hear his song here

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Common Raven Originally uploaded by quasimodo4502 What a beautiful bird this is, isn’t it? He looks like he has a helmet, almost, doesn’t he? This was taken by Quasimodo4502 at Golden Gate Park. You can see the original photograph on Flickr. =) I decided since it is Halloween, I would tell you a bit about the raven. =) Did you know the “common raven” is the most widely distributed corvid of all? It is all over the Northern hemisphere. Like me, they prefer to stay away from places too hot. =) They are omnivorous…meaning they will eat just about anything. This helps them survive and thrive. They are intelligent birds and beautiful. This is why they are so popular. There are poems about them, songs, [&hellip

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The first known bird was the Archaeopteryx which lived about 150-155 million years ago in the late Jurassic Period. It was found in 1861, helping fuel the evolution discussion. It lived in what is now Germany and was similar in the size and shape of a medium-sized bird but it could get up to 1.6 feet (um, I have never seen a bird that big!).1 It definitely could fly but to what extent or how well is not exactly known, but it also had sharp teeth and sharp three-fingered claws making it more dinosaur-like than bird-like. Makes you wonder when it became less necessary for those traits or has it? We can still see these same traits in one of the previous birds of the [&hellip

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