I found the neatest site today, birdtheme.org. The entire site is dedicate to bird stamps (postage stamps with birds on them) from all over the world. What a great site! How fun. Check it out, really. It makes me want to collect stamps but then I remember I do not have much room in my apartment and I can’t commit to collecting much. Of course, I can collect information because my brain hopefully has infinite storage space. For fun I chose Cuban bird stamps because it is an interesting, beautiful country with a range of wildlife diversity. I will share a few of the Cuban bird stamps I found on on the site… remember these are not mine but from birdtheme.org (FYI: I do not [&hellip

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The Magnificent Frigatebird was also mentioned in Luke Dempsey’s book, “A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birder’s and Their Quest To See It All.” So, it is going to be today’s bird of the day. =) This is a very interesting bird. It reminds me of the frogs that can puff up their bottom lip. I found these interesting facts at Cornell Lab of Ornithology: # rigatebirds are the only seabirds where the male and female look strikingly different. # The breeding period of the Magnificent Frigatebird is exceptionally long and young fledglings are often still being fed by the female at one year of age. # The male Magnificent Frigatebird abandons its mate and half-grown chick and leaves the breeding colony, presumably to molt [&hellip

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The reddish egret is a small colorful heron that likes warm places and staying active. It is found in the Caribbean, Texas, California, and Central America. In Texas it is considered “threatened”. Poor reddish egret! It prefers a cuisine of fish, frogs, crustaceans, and insects. Has anyone ever seen one of these in person? I heard of it in Luke Dempsey’s book, “A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birder’s and Their Quest To See It All.&#

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I read about this bird in Luke Dempsey’s book, “A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birder’s and Their Quest To See It All.” I did not have a clue what they were, so I looked them up and found they were very pretty birds. I decided they could be the bird of the day. =) YAY! According to Cornell Lab of Ornithology the Anhinga is known both as the the turkey of the water (because of its broad tail and swimming abilities) and the snake-bird “for its habit of swimming with just its long head and neck sticking out of the water.” * Size: 75-95 cm (30-37 in) * Wingspan: 109 cm (43 in) * Weight: 1325-1350 g (46.77-47.66 ounces) “The Anhinga is frequently seen [&hellip

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Today, I choose the Brewer’s Blackbird for the bird of the day (or what is seemingly the bird of the week) because my friend saw some in the parking lot of Target and took a picture on her cell phone for me. =) The picture quality is poor because it is a cell phone and so… here is a photograph I found on the internet: As with most birds the female is less colorful than the male. The female is dull brown and the male is iridescent black (black with a purplish/bluish tint). The female is smaller than the male. We see them in parking lots frequently, so they must have adapted well to suburban life. They are considered in the least conservationist concern category [&hellip

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Ha-ha-ha-ha-hahahahaha… woody woodpecker was fashioned after today’s bird, the Pileated Woodpecker. He’s sooooo cute. It is about the size of the crow which is actually large for a woodpecker. I wouldn’t have thought they’d be so small really. I don’t know why. Maybe I watched too many cartoons growing up and not enough birds in the trees. These woodpeckers peck at the wood to get sap and ants. Interestingly enough, they peck square holes in the trees. They peck so hard, they can break smaller trees. And the holes they peck into trees often become homes for smaller birds. The Pileated Woodpecker likes my neck of the woods, the Pacific Northwest, lucky me! =) Listen to the pileated woodpecker here (Source: Cornell Lab of Ornithology). [&hellip

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The Mallard is the most common duck seen in the United States. The males are more colorful than the females and this is so the female can choose from the males when it comes to mating. She should have a variety afterall. =) The Mallard (and the Muscovy Duck)1 are believed to be the ancestors of all domestic ducks. They are hardy birds able to adapt to almost anything and they eat a little bit of everything, so it seems. This adaptability to both environment and diet helps them survive and thrive, even when people are involved. I found their courting/mating ritual quite entertaining, it is not unlike that of the humans… “During courtship, three or more males may display simultaneously, shaking heads and tails, [&hellip

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Today’s bird is going to be the Barred Owl. Ask me why? Come on…ask me! Ask me why? BECAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE I have pictures of it. Not pictures that are creative commons. Not pictures I bought. Not pictures from postcard but actual live in-person pictures of the Barred Owl in the “Wetland Mitigation” in Redmond, WA. It is a small reserve of land between the Microsoft campus and an apartment complex. I am sooooo lucky to know someone who lives in this complex and works at Microsoft who is soooooo lucky to be able to walk through this beautiful area and see the coolest birds like this Barred Owl. And for the low, low price of NOTHING I am going to share this walk with you, the [&hellip

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