bird and short story Archive

THE PHŒNIX N the top of a palm tree, in an oasis of the Arabian desert, sat the Phœnix, glowering moodily upon the world below. He was alone, quite alone, in his old age, as he had been alone in his youth, and in his middle years; for the Phœnix has neither mate nor children, and there is never but one of his kind upon the earth. Once he had been proud of his solitariness and of his unusual beauty, which caused such wonder when he went abroad. But now he was old and weak and weary, and he was lonely, oh! so lonely! He had lived too long, he thought. For years and years and years, afar and apart, he had watched the coming [&hellip

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THE TUFTED CAP NE dark night Master Owl left his hollow tree and went prowling about the world as usual upon his hopeless hunt for the Princess’s betel-nut. As soon as he was out of hearing a long, lean, hungry Rat crept to the house and stole the dainties which the lonely old bachelor had stored away for the morrow’s dinner. The thief dragged them away to his own hole and had a splendid feast with his wife and little ones. But the Owl returned sooner than the Rat had expected, and by the crumbs which he had dropped upon the way tracked him to the hole. “Come out, thief!” cried the Owl, “or I will surely kill you. Come out and return to me [&hellip

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SISTER HEN AND THE CROCODILE HE Crocodile is one of the hungriest bodies that ever lived. When he is looking for a dinner he will eat almost anything that comes within reach. Sometimes the greedy fellow swallows great stones and chunks of wood, in his hurry mistaking them for something more digestible. And when he is smacking his great jaws over his food he makes such a greedy, terrible noise that the other animals steal away nervously and hide until it shall be Master Crocodile’s sleepy-time. He is too lazy to waddle in search of a dinner far from the river where he lives. But any animal or even a man-swimmer had best be careful how he ventures into the water near the Crocodile’s haunts. [&hellip

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THE GROUND-PIGEON NCE upon a time there was a little Malay maiden who lived in the forest with her father and mother and baby sister. They dwelt very happily together, until one day Coora’s father decided to clear the ground on the edge of the forest and have a rice plantation, as many of his neighbors were doing. So one morning early after breakfast he started out with his axe on his shoulder to cut down the trees and make a clearing. “O Father, let me go with you!” begged Coora. “I do so want to see the plantation grow from the very beginning.” But her father said No, she must stay at home until the trees were felled. “And after that may I go [&hellip

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THE EARLY GIRL HERE were once two girls who were very dear friends, Zaïca and Tourtourelle. One morning Zaïca woke up and said, “O Tourtourelle! Last night I had such a strange dream!” “And so did I!” cried Tourtourelle. “Let us tell each other the dreams. But you first, Zaïca.” Zaïca began to laugh. “I dreamed I was a pretty bird with a tuft of feathers on my head. I could fly, and, O Tourtourelle! it was great fun! But the most amusing thing of all was that I could sing so finely, and mock all the birds of the forest. Nay, I could even imitate the sounds of animals. I cannot help laughing when I think what a jolly time I had.” “Why, Zaïca!” [&hellip

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KING SOLOMON AND THE BIRDS ING SOLOMON was wiser than all men, and his fame was in all nations round about Jerusalem. He was so wise that he knew every spoken language; yes, but more than this, he could talk with everything that lived, trees and flowers, beasts and fowls, creeping things and fishes. What a very pleasant thing that was for Solomon, to be sure! And how glad one would be nowadays to have such knowledge! Solomon was especially fond of birds, and loved to talk with them because their voices were so sweet and they spoke such beautiful words. One day the wise King was chatting pleasantly with the birds who lived in his wonderful garden, and these are some of the things [&hellip

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THE WREN WHO BROUGHT FIRE ENTURIES and centuries ago, when men were first made, there was no such thing as fire known in all the world. Folk had no fire with which to cook their food, and so they were obliged to eat it raw; which was very unpleasant, as you may imagine! There were no cheery fireplaces about which to sit and tell stories, or make candy or pop corn. There was no light in the darkness at night except the sun and moon and stars. There were not even candles in those days, to say nothing of gas lamps or electric lights. It is strange to think of such a world where even the grown folks, like the children and the birds, had [&hellip

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