bird of the day Archive

There are actually three species of Gannets: Northern Gannet, (also known as “Solan Goose”), Morus bassanus Cape Gannet, Morus capensis Australasian Gannet, Morus serrator This post will focus on the Northern Gannet, also known as the “Solan Goose” or Morus bassanus. Northern Gannets are the largest seabird in the North Atlantic with a wingspan of 6 to 6.74 feet long!! Quite a big and impressive bird. According to Wikipedia, Gannets hunt fish by diving from a height into the sea and pursuing their prey underwater. Gannets have a number of adaptations which enable them to do this: they have no external nostrils; they have air sacs in their face and chest under their skin which act like bubble wrapping, cushioning the impact with the water; [&hellip

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Red-tailed black cockatoo Originally uploaded by dark orange The bird of the day today is the Red-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii). It is also known as Banksian- or Bank’s Black Cockatoo. It is found in Australia, those Australians, they get to see all the cool and rare birds. =) This is a big bird folks, about 24 inches LONG! Wow, two feet of bird. Despite its size, this very noisy bird prefers to eat mostly Eucalyptus seeds. A bird after my own heart. =) They can live up to or even longer than 50 years! Wow, a long-living, seed-eating bird. Nice. Growing up, my grandmother often had cockatoos but hers were white with yellow or red tufts. These are the more common type of cockatoo [&hellip

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Eastern Rosella Originally uploaded by ianmichaelthomas Today’s bird of the day is the Eastern Rosella, also known as Platycercus eximius. It is native to Australia and Tasmania but now is also found in New Zealand. I read you can have this bird as a pet but it is not very “cuddly”. Hahahaha. This bird photograph is from flickr user ianmichaelthomas. Here is what he had to say about this photograph (direct copy and paste): Another wild and free Australian native parrot! Australia can rightly be called the land of parrots. There are about 80 species in Australia. Eastern Rosella Another iconic Australian native parrot, the Eastern Rosella is spectacularly coloured, and similar in size to the Crimson rosella. Eastern rosellas are the mascot/emblem of Aussie [&hellip

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Stellar’s Jay Originally uploaded by Life of David The Stellar Jay, another bird found locally, is today’s bird of the day. It’s scientific name is Cyanocitta stelleri. It is common throughout the U.S. but I love it. I like to look at them. They are interesting and beautiful. They like seeds, nuts, berries, fruit, invertebrates, eggs, other bird’s nestlings (GASP!), acorns, conifer seeds and other things like them. It will join you for a picnic, if you bring the right food. You can read more about the Stellar Jay, even hear its call, here. http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Stellers_Jay.html

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GBH Originally uploaded by sproutter The Great Blue Heron…one of my favorite birds, albeit I have so many. This bird is so beautiful. I remember the first time I seen one. I was mesmerized by it and ever since, I’ve been on the lookout for it whenever I am near its habitat. Also known as Ardea herodias in the scientific world, this bird is the largest heron in North America. It can be from 36 to 55 inches from head to tail and has a wingspan of 66 to 79 inches! Many inches of awesome. =) It has a scratchy, throaty call. You can hear it here. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Great_Blue_Heron.ogg It eats small fish mostly but it will also eat shellfish, insects, rodents, amphibians (such as frogs), [&hellip

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American Robin (male) Originally uploaded by Wayne Weber The bird of the day today is the American Robin, (Turdus migratorius), what a strange scientific name. =/ It is found all over the U.S. and happens to be the state bird of three states (Michigan, Connecticut and Wisconsin)! I think it has earned that popularity. It is an attractive, social bird that sings loud and clear. =) You can hear it here. American Robins likes= to eat worms, earthworms in particular which ironically is reflected in the collective noun for American Robins: a worm of Robins. They also enjoy insects, fruits and berries. The American Robin lives everywhere in the U.S. — lawns, woodlands, shrubs, trees, even sheltered windowsills. It winters in moist woodlands, suburbs and [&hellip

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American Avocet Originally uploaded by Wayne Weber I did a search for bird of Washington State and found this bird, the American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana). It is found around marshes, beaches, ponds, and shallow lakes. It gets to be about 18 inches tall, about the size of a toddler. =) Straight from Cornell Lab of Ornithology, here are some cool facts about the American Avocet: # In response to predators, the American Avocet sometimes issues a series of call notes that gradually changes pitch, simulating the Doppler effect and thus making its approach seem faster than it actually is. # Nesting American Avocets aggressively attack predators, sometimes physically striking Northern Harriers or Common Ravens. # A female American Avocet may lay one to four eggs [&hellip

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White Breasted Nuthatch Originally uploaded by iceberg_ca White Breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) was an adorable bird we came across in our search for Anna’s hummingbird. In the photograph we looked at it was upside down. So cute! The White-breasted nuthatch eats insects out of tree trunks and branches, as well as seeds, acorns and hickory nuts. They live in trees, in small holes. It is about 5-6 inches long with a wingspan of 8-11 inches and weighs in at about 1/2 to 1 ounce. There are 9 subspecies of the White Breasted Nuthatch. One of these subspecies, the Sitta carolinensis aculeata, are found in Washington State! YAY!

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Poecile sclateri. Originally uploaded by Pablo Lèautaud. I found the Mexican Chickadee (Poecile sclateri) in my National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Birds of North America. I was looking for a hummingbird we wanted to identify. We feed some crows everyday and when we put out the peanuts for them the other day we noticed a hummingbird in the tree near our railing. This was very exciting for us! We may be getting a hummingbird feeder soon! YAY! =) Ok, back to the Mexican Chickadee. While flipping through the book I passed by it and wrote it down. I just had to include it as today’s bird of the day because it is a puff ball. It is a songbird. YAY for songbirds! They are [&hellip

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Grosbeak the Rose-Breasted type Originally uploaded by ut.law97 The Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) is the bird of the day! =) I read about him in the book, A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders And Their Quest To See It All by Luke Dempsey. It prefers to live in “open deciduous woods” and can be found in Canada and the Eastern part of the United States. It has more recently began to extend its range towards the west because of “misguided fire prevention policies which have created habitat on the Great Plains.” The Rose breasted Grosbeak eats insects, seeds and berries. It prefers a thinner nest, so thin you can often see through the nest to the eggs from below it. (Cornell Lab of Ornithology) [&hellip

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