bird Archive

MRS. PARTRIDGE’S BABIES ONG, long ago, when the world was very young indeed, the Birds and Animals used to send their children to school, to Mother Magpie’s kindergarten. All the morning long the babies learned their lessons which it was needful for them to know. And when the noon hour came their various mammas came to the school bringing lunches for the children. You can imagine how gladly they were received by the hungry little scholars. One day Mrs. Partridge was very busy with her house-cleaning, and when the noontime came she could not leave her work to go to the school with her babies’ lunch. “Dear me,” she said, looking out of the nest, “here it is noon and the little Partridges will be [&hellip

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THE ROBIN WHO WAS AN INDIAN HE name of Robin makes us think at once of the jolliest and most sociable of all our little brother birds. In every land the name is a favorite, and wherever he goes he brings happiness and kind feeling. The American Robin is not the same bird as his English cousin, though both have red breasts. It was in a different manner that our little American friend came to have the ruddy waistcoat which we know so well. There was a time, so the Indians say, a very early time, long, long before Columbus discovered America,—even before histories began to be written,—when there were no Robins. In those days in the land of the Ojibways, which is far in [&hellip

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THE PIOUS ROBIN “Art thou the bird whom man loves best, The pious bird with the scarlet breast, Our little English Robin?” Wordsworth. HE English Robin is not precisely like our little American friend whom we call by that name, although, as the lines of poetry quoted above will show, in two ways he is the same as ours: he has a red breast, and he is the bird whom every one loves. Of all the little brothers of the air, in every land and clime, the pretty, jolly, neighborly Robin Redbreast is the favorite. There are many stories about him: some which tell how he came by his scarlet breast, others which explain why he has always been best beloved of the birds. I [&hellip

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THE MASQUERADING CROW HE Crow became very sour and disagreeable after his friend the Peacock’s cousin deserted him for more gorgeous company. Though he pretended not to care because the Pheasant was now a proud, beautifully-coated dandy, while he was the shabbiest of all the birds in his coat of rusty black, yet in truth he did care very much. He could not forget how the Peacock’s cousin had dyed him this sombre hue, after promising to paint him bright and wonderful, like himself. He could not help thinking how fine he would have looked in similar plumage of a rainbow tint, or how becoming a long swallow-tail would be to his style of beauty. He wished that there was a tailor in Birdland to [&hellip

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THE PEACOCK’S COUSIN ONG, long ago in the days of wise King Solomon, the Crow and the Pheasant were the best of friends, and were always seen going about together, wing in wing. Now the Pheasant was the Peacock’s own cousin,—a great honor, many thought, for the Peacock was the most gorgeous of all the birds. But it was not altogether pleasant for the Pheasant, because at that time he wore such plain and shabby old garments that his proud relative was ashamed of him, and did not like to be reminded that they were of the same family. When the Peacock went strutting about with his wonderful tail spread fan-wise, and with his vain little eyes peering to see who might be admiring his [&hellip

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Window Birding Originally uploaded by Lens of mine What a lovely shot… the composition, the bird, the sepia tone… I love it. This person can appreciate a good photograph, a beautiful moment. I love it. Birdy at his window

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Ever wondered what it was like to fly like a bird? Play Fly Like a Bird 2 (free online game) and find out. Here are a couple screen shots of the game. As you can see from my Zero score—I fly as well as I drive. Maybe you will do better than me… let me know. =) I would love to know your scores—and possibly some flying tips

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