birding Archive

Good morning fellow Nerd Birders! I have another excellent Princeton Field Guide review to share with you today, Birds of Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire by Bart De Boer, Eric Newton, and Robin Restall. This guide is the first and only of its kind for this area of the world, which makes it an important contribution to the birding community. It visually different, as you can see, from the other Princeton Field Guides I reviewed this week (North America and Greenland & Hawaii, New Zealand and the Central and West Pacific). It begins with an interesting introduction, giving us a feel for the area we are exploring with a map of the are as well as its succinct history. Then it goes into general flora and [&hellip

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by: Brian Ramsey Some individuals enjoy bird watching but prefer to do their bird watching in their back yard. Below is some advice on attracting wild birds to your back yard. Firstly it depends upon having wild birds in the general area where your house is located and then you can attract then to your backyard. The method used to attract the birds will depend upon what is the diet of the bird. If the bird is a nectar feeder e.g. bananaquits or hummingbirds, then large flowering plants will attract them. Hummingbird bills are perfectly adapted to the various types of flowers that they feed on, so different types of flowers will attract different hummingbirds. Some hummingbirds have especially curved or elongated bills that allow [&hellip

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by: Jackie Gee What is it that lures grown men (and women) into the undergrowth to get cold, wet and muddy just to gaze at our feathered friends? Many people are discovering birdwatching and finding it to be an immensely rewarding pastime. In this article Jackie Gee explores why birding is such a pleasurable activity for more and more people. My first experience of deliberate birdwatching took place in Richmond Great Park. The time; 1966, the occasion; one of the first dates with my (now) husband. There I was, all dressed up and ready to knock him out with my drop dead gorgeousness (memory plays strange tricks as you get older!) and there he was, luring me into the undergrowth of the park, hissing to [&hellip

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by: John Marcus Bird watching is a fantastic hobby suitable for individuals of all ages. In addition to enjoying the great outdoors and gaining an appreciation for nature, bird watching is a hobby that can be shared with friends and family. Many bird watchers find themselves healthier due to their time outside scanning the skies for that ultra-rare bird. If you are interested in beginning bird watching as a hobby, consider the following tips to get your started and on the right track. 1.) Get a book. Most bird watchers are not experts on our fine feathered friends from the start. Instead of thinking, a bird is a bird is a bird, think again! Birds are a fabulous species that are as diverse as any [&hellip

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by: Rick Chapo No bird watcher is complete without his or her bird watching journals. When you go bird watching, you need to keep your life list. The Life List If you are or become an avid bird watching enthusiast, you’re going to need to keep records. The reason for this is you want to keep a running list of the various bird species you’ve seen. Since there are a zillion species, the list can become quite long. Frankly, it becomes a life long project that is very enjoyable. Trust me, you’ll start planning vacations and trips around it. A business trip will soon evolve into a chance to see new species. Part and parcel to your bird watching life list is your journal. Some [&hellip

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by: Bill MacArthur With the coming of autumn in the Northern hemisphere, there is the usual migration of birds to warmer areas of the continent. There are a number of challenges that go along with birding in the autumn.Young birds are harder to identify as their plumage may not have reached maturity. They may not match up to the bird you are looking at in your standard birder’s guide. Birds may also be molting at this time of year. Another issue may be the changing color of the leaves and the grey skies of fall (depending on your location and the exact time you are bird watching of course). Hawks and other autumn-toned birds can be harder to spot. Best binoculars To spy birds best, [&hellip

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