Birds Archive

by: John Marcus Bird watching is a fantastic hobby suitable for individuals of all ages. In addition to enjoying the great outdoors and gaining an appreciation for nature, bird watching is a hobby that can be shared with friends and family. Many bird watchers find themselves healthier due to their time outside scanning the skies for that ultra-rare bird. If you are interested in beginning bird watching as a hobby, consider the following tips to get your started and on the right track. 1.) Get a book. Most bird watchers are not experts on our fine feathered friends from the start. Instead of thinking, a bird is a bird is a bird, think again! Birds are a fabulous species that are as diverse as any [&hellip

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by: Kisibo Jackie Uganda is an equatorial country with an amazing diversity of Habitats. Truly a Kingdom of Birds, Uganda hosts over 1000 bird species, both Albertine Rift endemics as well as rarities with half of the species known on the African continent, and over 10% of those on record throughout the entire world. For a birding safari, Uganda is a perfect destination. The country located in the Albertine region also lies on the Northern shores of Lake Victoria-the source of the White Nile, and the country is extremely fertile with parks, wildlife, lakes and rivers, Mountain ranges, parks and a cool attractive countryside. Uganda enjoys a tropical climate with rainy seasons stretching from April-May and October-November, which is a favorable condition for bird existence [&hellip

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Worms are reportedly tasteless but provide essential protein and water to birds. Worms are made up for 80% water, 14% protein, 2% nitrogen, 2% oil and 2% ash. So, before you wince at the thought of getting live mealworms for your bird feeders, think about how much the little birdies love them. They are a favorite of many birds. Here are some other things you can do to help the worms and the birds who enjoy them: Do not use insecticides or slug pellets. Buy worms and place them in your garden or a patch of soil. Plant shrubs, trees or plants native to your area—this will increase the likelihood of worms. Grow annuals and perennials which will attract nectar-feeding insects. Leave log piles, decaying [&hellip

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Ladies in France during the 17th and 18th centuries had many refined hobbies to keep them occupied. One such hobby was to entice and train their pet canaries and finches, songbirds or serins in French.  These women often used a Serinette to accomplish this task. The Serinette is a hand cranked musical device resembling a music box. Typically these were made of walnut and had a crank mounted in the front. When the women cranked the handle air was pumped into bellows which supplied air to the pipes while simultaneously turning a wooden barrel with gears. Brass pins and staples were driven into the barrel where the music pieces were encoded. Hanging over the barrel was a bar carrying wooden keys connected to valves by [&hellip

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OH! We are very excited to be working on a social networking site just for birders. This will be a place where you can upload photographs to share, blog about your latest birding adventures — new feeders, houses etc. You will be able to make new friends with similar interests, share websites and keep up to date with fellow birders online. It is almost ready! As soon as it is complete…we will be sharing it! We hope to see you there… Nerd Birders It is still being updated but if you are super enthusiastic and want to be part of it RIGHT NOW, simply click on the link above and join! You can be part of the beginning of something special just for birders! Or [&hellip

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There are approximately 200 different kinds of woodpeckers in the world. In Washington State we have four native woodpeckers: The Pileated Woodpecker, the Northern Flicker, the Downy Woodpecker, and the Red-Breasted Sapsucker. At least three of these live in the Redmond Wetland Mitigation, our backyard. This of course made it easy for us to find these great woodpeckers. As it were, one of the first birds we caught on camera (and video) was the Pileated Woodpecker, Dryocopus pileatus, but we couldn’t get a very good photo at the time. Today, we got a few better photos. They are mischievous little buggers. They like to look away or hide way up in the trees. I think they prefer not to have their photographs taken. You might [&hellip

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The House Sparrow or Passer domesticus is the only Old World Sparrow (meaning it was brought over by Europe — the old world…) we have in Washington State and they come in abundance to my porch. They are also known as English Sparrow because they were brought over to Central Park in the 1850’s in an effort to populate the park with every bird mentioned in Shakespeare’s plays. What a sweet sentiment but how it was not such an intelligent idea. They were also re-introduced in the 1870’s to “control pests”. This did not work. Too bad they flourished at the expense of many native birds, such as the Bluebirds and other native cavity-dwelling birds. Now they are one of the most abundant birds found [&hellip

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The following are the 20 common North American birds with the greatest population declines since 1967. Click on the name to view each individual profile to learn how you can help. #1 Northern Bobwhite a chubby, robin-sized bird that runs along the ground in groups and is found in grasslands mixed with shrubs or widely spaced trees throughout much of the Eastern United States. #2 Evening Grosbeak: a rotund, robin-sized bird found in the mountains of the western United States and Canada; the boreal forest of Canada and the northern edge of the United States east to Nova Scotia. #3 Northern Pintail: a Mallard-sized “puddle duck” with a slim body found in grassy uplands and untilled crop fields near shallow seasonal and semi-permanent wetlands in [&hellip

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Friday, February 13th till Monday, February 16th 2009… the 12th Annual Great Backyard Bird Count is happening. What is the Great Backyard Bird Count? The following is copied and pasted from the original site. The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event that engages bird watchers of all ages in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where the birds are across the continent. Anyone can participate, from beginning bird watchers to experts. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy—and it helps the birds. Participants count birds anywhere for as little or as long as they wish during the [&hellip

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