Birds Archive

A bird of prey, similar to the families of hawks, eagles and vultures this bird falls into the “raptors” category. But according to Wikipedia this classification is being investigated. These birds like the warm tropical climates (notice a pattern?). They like to snack on apple snails. Anyone know what an apple snail is? Just kidding, this is what an apple snail looks like when it is being eaten by a Snail Kite

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The Crested Caracara is a large, ground-dwelling falcon. To me, it looks similar to many falcons but it is more colorful perhaps. Albeit, I have little experience with falcons. Interesting Facts about the Crested Caracara (Source: Whatbird.com): * A common subject of folklore and legends throughout Central and South America, the Crested Caracara is sometimes referred to as the “Mexican eagle.” * Although it looks like a long-legged hawk and associates with vultures, it is actually in the same family as falcons. * A group of falcons has many collective nouns, including a “bazaar”, “eyrie”, “ringing up”, “stooping up”, and “tower” of falcons. (And yes, this too I found in Luke Dempsey’s book, “A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birder’s and Their Quest To See [&hellip

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The Mangrove Cuckoo is a cute little bird with an extremely interesting and almost funny call (sound). Listen to this bird at Bird Watcher’s Digest (yes, I do subscribe to this magazine!) Don’t you think it makes interesting sounds? I also like its curved beak. It curves downwards like a hook. The Mangrove Cuckoo breeds in Florida but then heads to the tropics for winter. It prefers to frequent the local swamp. Anyone know why? And yes, I also found this little bird in Luke Dempsey’s book, “A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birder’s and Their Quest To See It All.&#

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This interesting bird eats mostly insects but also likes berries and seeds. Aside from the insects I could go for their diet. That is about what I like nowadays! =) Fun stuff. They are approximately 7.6 – 8.8 inches (19-22cm) as fully grown birds. They prefer a tropical climate and only accidentally show up in Florida. This classifies them as a “vagrant bird” (a term birders use to refer to birds that come accidentally or by chance to a location rather than normal migration patterns). I found this bird from Luke Dempsey’s book, “A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birder’s and Their Quest To See It All.&#

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Today, I choose the Brewer’s Blackbird for the bird of the day (or what is seemingly the bird of the week) because my friend saw some in the parking lot of Target and took a picture on her cell phone for me. =) The picture quality is poor because it is a cell phone and so… here is a photograph I found on the internet: As with most birds the female is less colorful than the male. The female is dull brown and the male is iridescent black (black with a purplish/bluish tint). The female is smaller than the male. We see them in parking lots frequently, so they must have adapted well to suburban life. They are considered in the least conservationist concern category [&hellip

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Ha-ha-ha-ha-hahahahaha… woody woodpecker was fashioned after today’s bird, the Pileated Woodpecker. He’s sooooo cute. It is about the size of the crow which is actually large for a woodpecker. I wouldn’t have thought they’d be so small really. I don’t know why. Maybe I watched too many cartoons growing up and not enough birds in the trees. These woodpeckers peck at the wood to get sap and ants. Interestingly enough, they peck square holes in the trees. They peck so hard, they can break smaller trees. And the holes they peck into trees often become homes for smaller birds. The Pileated Woodpecker likes my neck of the woods, the Pacific Northwest, lucky me! =) Listen to the pileated woodpecker here (Source: Cornell Lab of Ornithology). [&hellip

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The Laughing Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae, is an Australian carnivorous bird in the Kingfisher family. This species of kookaburra is well known for its laughing call. Taxonomy The Laughing Kookaburra was first described by French naturalist Johann Hermann in 1783, its specific epithet novaeguineae refers to New Guinea. For many years it was known as Dacelo gigas. Previously known as the Laughing Jackass it is now best known by its aboriginal name. Distribution It is found throughout eastern Australia, and has been introduced into the south-west corner of Western Australia, Tasmania, Flinders Island, Kangaroo Island. Furthermore, some were also introduced into New Zealand between 1866 and 1880, but only those liberated on Kawau Island by Sir George Grey survived. Descendants are still found there today. Description [&hellip

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