Book Review Archive

I love birds! And I would love to go on an extended birding holiday seeing as many birds as I possibly can… a year, two? I would LOVE that… but alas it is not possible quite yet. So, the next best thing is to go through all the bird field guides I can and prepare for the day I can… read about all the lovely birds and choose the path I will one day take to see as many interesting birds as I can. So, in my journey towards a birding paradise holiday, I am reading (and reviewing) as many bird field guides as possible! =) I’ve been reading them for months but I thought I should share them with you as well. Why not? [&hellip

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Hello fellow bird lovers! I have another field guide review for you today. The Princeton Field Guide: Birds of the Middle East by Richard Porter & Simon Aspinall. This field guide is not unlike the other Princeton Field Guides1. It begins with a succinct but informative introduction, giving some insight into the area being covered in the guide, why certain birds were excluded, why some disputed birds were included. It includes a thorough illustrated diagram of bird topography (what a bird looks like, naming its various parts) and gives a good explanation of the voice (or call/song) of each bird. The authors even go into detail about how voice recordings lag far behind photographic identification of birds. The opening pages are not at all lengthy [&hellip

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Good morning fellow Nerd Birders! I have another excellent Princeton Field Guide review to share with you today, Birds of Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire by Bart De Boer, Eric Newton, and Robin Restall. This guide is the first and only of its kind for this area of the world, which makes it an important contribution to the birding community. It visually different, as you can see, from the other Princeton Field Guides I reviewed this week (North America and Greenland & Hawaii, New Zealand and the Central and West Pacific). It begins with an interesting introduction, giving us a feel for the area we are exploring with a map of the are as well as its succinct history. Then it goes into general flora and [&hellip

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Hello Nerd Birders! I have another wonderful guide book to tell you about. Like the Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific Princeton Guide, this guide, Birds of North America and Greenland by Norman Arlott is an excellent hand guide for birds in North America and Greenland. It features the same type of amazing illustrations of the various birds on the right side pages and the descriptions on the left. Each bird is identified by its multiple names, where it can be found, when it can be found there, its habitat, its specific calls/songs, distinguishing characteristics and a colorful illustration of each particular bird. Like the other books in this series, Birds of North America and Greenland is made with water [&hellip

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I think one can never have too many bird guides. Each one gives a unique perspective in helping identify various birds. We all have our preferences but knowing that some guides lend themselves to some aspects of bird identification, while others focus on other aspects or a broader view for beginners. It is good to have a variety to choose from. The Princeton Illustrated Checklists: Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific by Ber van Perlo is useful for not only people living in these places or visiting them but also in giving a sneak peak into the birds some of us may never see. I learned of a few new birds I had never heard of before reading this book. [&hellip

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Why a book review on a field guide to Dinosaurs on a bird-related site? Because birds are direct descendants of dinosaurs and some species are actually living dinosaurs! The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs by Gregory S. Paul is brilliant! It is the very first and most comprehensive field guide to dinosaurs. This book amazed me with its intricate drawings, vast research, the sheer number of dinosaurs now discovered! This is definitely not the limited information we had as children about dinosaurs. I remember learning about the couple of dozen of types of dinosaurs in elementary school and thinking they were so fascinating. What I learned back then pales in comparison to what I learned from this book. The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs is [&hellip

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The Crossley ID Guide: Eastern Birds by Richard Crossley is a remarkable bird guide indeed. This is the first time I have used a Crossley Guide and it is just simply wonderful in its design. It is unique in its approach to helping people identify birds, no matter what level of birder you are from beginner to expert, you will find this guide useful. While most bird field guides use the majority of space to give information detailing the specific physical traits of each bird, they often have one or two photographs of each bird. They rely heavily on detailed physical description for identification. This is good but it is not always easy to correctly identify birds this way, particularly when you are just learning to [&hellip

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Birds of Western North America: A Photographic Guide by Paul Sterry & Brian E. Small is a vibrant, detailed guide to hundreds of birds focusing on the birds found in the western half of North America. The introduction is well-written, easy to understand and concise–walking you step-by-step how to use the guide most effectively. It is laid out in a way that is simple to follow, intuitive and useful for all levels of bird enthusiasts from beginner to experienced. I read it from cover to cover and found interesting new birds to put on my must-see list and found the process enjoyable! Many bird guides are not well laid out and you find yourself flipping back and forth to find information about the same bird, this is not [&hellip

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Birds of Eastern North America: A Photographic Guide by Paul Sterry & Brian E. Small is a vibrant, detailed guide to hundreds of birds found in the eastern half of North America. The introduction is well-written, easy to understand and concise. It walks you step-by-step how to use this book most effectively. The book is laid out in a way that is simple to follow, intuitive and useful for all levels of bird enthusiasts from beginner to experienced. I read it from cover to cover and found interesting new birds to put on my must-see list and found the process enjoyable! Many bird guides are not well laid out and you find yourself flipping back and forth to find information about the same bird, this is not one of those guides! Each [&hellip

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A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders and Their Quest To See It All by Luke Dempsey I thought it would be worth the time if I started to do some informal book reviews on the bird-related books I read. =) I will start with my most recent, A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders and Their Quest To See It All by Luke Dempsey. I have taken many a bird from this book to make a daily bird. It mentions many birds and even gives a little detail about some of them. This book is a quick, fun read. It details how the author, Luke Dempsey, begins his love affair with birds and how it progesses. He is very personable and tells the story [&hellip

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