daily bird Archive

Due to inconsistent posting and lack of time, I regret to inform you, we will no longer be doing “Bird of the Day” but rather we will focus on “Bird of the Week”. =) This is more doable and I can really research each bird. More fun, more knowledge, more understanding. And, if you the readers want contribute by researching a bird, I would love to post it here. Simply e-mail me

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Red-tailed black cockatoo Originally uploaded by dark orange The bird of the day today is the Red-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii). It is also known as Banksian- or Bank’s Black Cockatoo. It is found in Australia, those Australians, they get to see all the cool and rare birds. =) This is a big bird folks, about 24 inches LONG! Wow, two feet of bird. Despite its size, this very noisy bird prefers to eat mostly Eucalyptus seeds. A bird after my own heart. =) They can live up to or even longer than 50 years! Wow, a long-living, seed-eating bird. Nice. Growing up, my grandmother often had cockatoos but hers were white with yellow or red tufts. These are the more common type of cockatoo [&hellip

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Eastern Rosella Originally uploaded by ianmichaelthomas Today’s bird of the day is the Eastern Rosella, also known as Platycercus eximius. It is native to Australia and Tasmania but now is also found in New Zealand. I read you can have this bird as a pet but it is not very “cuddly”. Hahahaha. This bird photograph is from flickr user ianmichaelthomas. Here is what he had to say about this photograph (direct copy and paste): Another wild and free Australian native parrot! Australia can rightly be called the land of parrots. There are about 80 species in Australia. Eastern Rosella Another iconic Australian native parrot, the Eastern Rosella is spectacularly coloured, and similar in size to the Crimson rosella. Eastern rosellas are the mascot/emblem of Aussie [&hellip

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Stellar’s Jay Originally uploaded by Life of David The Stellar Jay, another bird found locally, is today’s bird of the day. It’s scientific name is Cyanocitta stelleri. It is common throughout the U.S. but I love it. I like to look at them. They are interesting and beautiful. They like seeds, nuts, berries, fruit, invertebrates, eggs, other bird’s nestlings (GASP!), acorns, conifer seeds and other things like them. It will join you for a picnic, if you bring the right food. You can read more about the Stellar Jay, even hear its call, here. http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Stellers_Jay.html

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GBH Originally uploaded by sproutter The Great Blue Heron…one of my favorite birds, albeit I have so many. This bird is so beautiful. I remember the first time I seen one. I was mesmerized by it and ever since, I’ve been on the lookout for it whenever I am near its habitat. Also known as Ardea herodias in the scientific world, this bird is the largest heron in North America. It can be from 36 to 55 inches from head to tail and has a wingspan of 66 to 79 inches! Many inches of awesome. =) It has a scratchy, throaty call. You can hear it here. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Great_Blue_Heron.ogg It eats small fish mostly but it will also eat shellfish, insects, rodents, amphibians (such as frogs), [&hellip

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American Robin (male) Originally uploaded by Wayne Weber The bird of the day today is the American Robin, (Turdus migratorius), what a strange scientific name. =/ It is found all over the U.S. and happens to be the state bird of three states (Michigan, Connecticut and Wisconsin)! I think it has earned that popularity. It is an attractive, social bird that sings loud and clear. =) You can hear it here. American Robins likes= to eat worms, earthworms in particular which ironically is reflected in the collective noun for American Robins: a worm of Robins. They also enjoy insects, fruits and berries. The American Robin lives everywhere in the U.S. — lawns, woodlands, shrubs, trees, even sheltered windowsills. It winters in moist woodlands, suburbs and [&hellip

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Bewick’s Wren Originally uploaded by sproutter Another birdy found in Washington State, the Bewick’s Wren, (Thryomanes bewickii). I read this species is the only one in the category Thryomanes and that there is a subspecies called the Seattle Wren. I think you can guess what tomorrow’s bird of the day will be… =) It is a small bird who likes to live in urban areas, near houses and once found throughout the eastern part of the U.S., it is mostly located in the western part now. They speculate this is because of the tricky ways of the House Wren. I seen one of these eating something near the peanuts I fed the crows this morning. It is about 5 inches and likes spiders and insects. [&hellip

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