mating Archive

Everything plays. Playing helps with motor and sensory skills as well as social behavior. It relieves stress. It teaches the young many important things needed for survival through the process of trial and error while they can still afford to make mistakes. It keeps relationships healthy. Social play helps children gain friends. Social play helps young lovers meet and flirt. Social play teaches us how to behave according to our social norms. It can give us solid practice on our role in society. Birds are no different than us. They play, although not all birds use social play. But young birds play more than fully grown birds. Bird play is often spontaneous and free-spirited. And corvids engage in all manners of play, including social play. [&hellip

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Beaks, bills, bird noses—whatever you call them—they are important to every bird.1 They are full of live tissues, regenerating after the billing (a puffin’s form of kissing / affection), bill-wiping, eating, and defending their young. The tips of bird beaks grow constantly due to the continually wear and tear. Some bird’s beaks even grow longer according to the season. The beak of the Puffin is one example of this seasonal color change. Puffins molt the the colorful outer sheath of their bills after breeding (seasonally). Their beaks brighten or fade in color when the old skin is worn down and the new layers are revealed depending on which season it happens to be. Maybe they do not need the extra attention after they have wooed [&hellip

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The Peregrine falcon is NOT the fastest bird in the world. Some believe the fastest bird is the Peregrine Falcon, Falco peregrinus, which supposedly flies between 124 – 175 mph. They actually fly around at about 40 to 60 mph (64 to 100 km/h) but are reported to be capable of reaching 175 mph (282 km/h) in a dive. The peregrine must not go this fast in an attack or it would smash into the ground at that dangerous speed, can you imagine?1 Other birds cruise around at faster speeds of 55 to 70 mph (89 to 113 km/h) such as the waterfowls and shorebirds or the Red-breasted Merganser Mergus serrator who sustains a cool 80 mph (129 km/h) for long distances. Even if you include [&hellip

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