New Zealand Archive

I think one can never have too many bird guides. Each one gives a unique perspective in helping identify various birds. We all have our preferences but knowing that some guides lend themselves to some aspects of bird identification, while others focus on other aspects or a broader view for beginners. It is good to have a variety to choose from. The Princeton Illustrated Checklists: Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific by Ber van Perlo is useful for not only people living in these places or visiting them but also in giving a sneak peak into the birds some of us may never see. I learned of a few new birds I had never heard of before reading this book. [&hellip

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Eastern Rosella Originally uploaded by ianmichaelthomas Today’s bird of the day is the Eastern Rosella, also known as Platycercus eximius. It is native to Australia and Tasmania but now is also found in New Zealand. I read you can have this bird as a pet but it is not very “cuddly”. Hahahaha. This bird photograph is from flickr user ianmichaelthomas. Here is what he had to say about this photograph (direct copy and paste): Another wild and free Australian native parrot! Australia can rightly be called the land of parrots. There are about 80 species in Australia. Eastern Rosella Another iconic Australian native parrot, the Eastern Rosella is spectacularly coloured, and similar in size to the Crimson rosella. Eastern rosellas are the mascot/emblem of Aussie [&hellip

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The bird of the day is the Cassowary. It is a shy, flightless bird and has no problem getting aggressive, if needed. It prefers to live deep in the forest far away from people. And it should stay that way. I read that hand-feeding the cassowary is extremely dangerous to the animal and aiding in its demise, so don’t do it! These birds are very interesting indeed. One of the cassowaries (the Southern) is the 2nd heaviest extant bird in the world after the ostrich and third tallest (after ostrich and emu). It sorta looks like it is in that family of birds, doesn’t it? Interestingly enough the females are both bigger and more brightly colored. This is different than many birds. YAY! WOMAN COLOR [&hellip

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The kiwi is a flightless, endangered bird found only in New Zealand (and is also their national symbol). It is sad to think of any bird going extinct. I cringe at the thought. I am saddened by the loss of life. (I am sharing the following information directly from Wikipedia) Currently, there are five accepted species (one of which has four sub-species), plus one to be formally described. * The largest species is the Great Spotted Kiwi or Roroa, Apteryx haastii, which stands about 45 cm (17.7 inches) high and weighs about 3.3 kg. (Males about 2.4 kg) It has grey-brown plumage with lighter bands. The female lays just one egg, with both sexes incubating. Population is estimated to be over 20,000, distributed through the [&hellip

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The Laughing Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae, is an Australian carnivorous bird in the Kingfisher family. This species of kookaburra is well known for its laughing call. Taxonomy The Laughing Kookaburra was first described by French naturalist Johann Hermann in 1783, its specific epithet novaeguineae refers to New Guinea. For many years it was known as Dacelo gigas. Previously known as the Laughing Jackass it is now best known by its aboriginal name. Distribution It is found throughout eastern Australia, and has been introduced into the south-west corner of Western Australia, Tasmania, Flinders Island, Kangaroo Island. Furthermore, some were also introduced into New Zealand between 1866 and 1880, but only those liberated on Kawau Island by Sir George Grey survived. Descendants are still found there today. Description [&hellip

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