Puffins Archive

For all you nerd birders out there here is your chance to sign up for some fantastic bird-related camps (FOR ADULTS!) How fun? What better way to spend some time than to learn about your favorite birds, help with their conservation and hobnob with the best avian researchers in the world? Sign up for one of the Audubon’s Ornithology camps. Find more information here. They have many to choose from…here is a video for Hog Island Audubon Camp in Maine

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Beaks, bills, bird noses—whatever you call them—they are important to every bird.1 They are full of live tissues, regenerating after the billing (a puffin’s form of kissing / affection), bill-wiping, eating, and defending their young. The tips of bird beaks grow constantly due to the continually wear and tear. Some bird’s beaks even grow longer according to the season. The beak of the Puffin is one example of this seasonal color change. Puffins molt the the colorful outer sheath of their bills after breeding (seasonally). Their beaks brighten or fade in color when the old skin is worn down and the new layers are revealed depending on which season it happens to be. Maybe they do not need the extra attention after they have wooed [&hellip

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Rhinoceros Auklet, Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport, OR Originally uploaded by chuqui This photograph was taken by Chuqui on flickr at the , Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport, Oregon. The Rhinoceros Auklet is not very well known but it is considered, by some, to be part of the puffin family. They are debating on whether they should rename it the Rhinoceros Puffin since it is so closely related to the puffin family. Is a puffin a puffin by any other name? Apparently. This puffin has many names: Cerorhinca monocerata, the Rhino Auklet, the Horn-billed Puffin or the Unicorn Puffin. (I think I prefer the latter but I’ll try to use all of them to get us accustomed to them all.) This cute little bird gets its [&hellip

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The Puffin family of birds is small. It always has been. But there were more along time ago. Fossils including eggshells, bones of immature birds, and articulated skeletons suggest that nesting colonies of an older puffin once occurred on San Miguel and San Nicolas islands off the coasts of California. The Dow’s Puffin was relative in size to the Rhinoceros Auklet and the Horned Puffin but its skull was more like the Rhinoceros Auklet and the Tufted Puffin. It is the latter two which are now considered its closest relatives. It is not the size or shape of the bird fossils that distinguish the Dow’s Puffin from other Puffins but rather the “degree of dorsoventral expansion of the bill and mandible.” (See figure 4 — [&hellip

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