short stories and birds Archive

THE GOOD HUNTER NCE upon a time there was an Indian who was a famous hunter. But he did not hunt for fun; he took no pleasure in killing the little wild creatures, birds and beasts and fishes, and did so only when it was necessary for him to have food or skins for his clothing. He was a very kind and generous man, and loved all the wood-creatures dearly, often feeding them from his own larder, and protecting them from their enemies. So the animals and birds loved him as their best friend, and he was known as the Good Hunter. The Good Hunter was very brave, and often went to war with the fierce savages who were the enemies of his tribe. One [&hellip

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THE OWL AND THE MOON HEN the moon is round and full, if you look very carefully at the golden disk you can see in shadowy outline the profile of a beautiful lady. She is leaning forward as if looking down upon our earth, and there is a little smile upon her sweet lips. This fair dame is Putri Balan, the Princess of the Moon, and she smiles because she remembers how once upon a time she cheated old Mr. Owl, her tiresome lover. Putri Balan, so they tell you in Malay, was always very, very beautiful, as we see her now. Like all the Malay women, Putri Balan loved to chew the spicy betel-nut which turns one’s lips a bright scarlet. It is better, [&hellip

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THE GROUND-PIGEON NCE upon a time there was a little Malay maiden who lived in the forest with her father and mother and baby sister. They dwelt very happily together, until one day Coora’s father decided to clear the ground on the edge of the forest and have a rice plantation, as many of his neighbors were doing. So one morning early after breakfast he started out with his axe on his shoulder to cut down the trees and make a clearing. “O Father, let me go with you!” begged Coora. “I do so want to see the plantation grow from the very beginning.” But her father said No, she must stay at home until the trees were felled. “And after that may I go [&hellip

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MRS. PARTRIDGE’S BABIES ONG, long ago, when the world was very young indeed, the Birds and Animals used to send their children to school, to Mother Magpie’s kindergarten. All the morning long the babies learned their lessons which it was needful for them to know. And when the noon hour came their various mammas came to the school bringing lunches for the children. You can imagine how gladly they were received by the hungry little scholars. One day Mrs. Partridge was very busy with her house-cleaning, and when the noontime came she could not leave her work to go to the school with her babies’ lunch. “Dear me,” she said, looking out of the nest, “here it is noon and the little Partridges will be [&hellip

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THE ROBIN WHO WAS AN INDIAN HE name of Robin makes us think at once of the jolliest and most sociable of all our little brother birds. In every land the name is a favorite, and wherever he goes he brings happiness and kind feeling. The American Robin is not the same bird as his English cousin, though both have red breasts. It was in a different manner that our little American friend came to have the ruddy waistcoat which we know so well. There was a time, so the Indians say, a very early time, long, long before Columbus discovered America,—even before histories began to be written,—when there were no Robins. In those days in the land of the Ojibways, which is far in [&hellip

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