woodpecker Archive

Giant Woody Woodpecker, originally uploaded by Lifeinthenorthwoods.com Happy New Year. This Pileated Woodpecker must not have been as camera shy as the one’s around my place… excellent! This reminds me of some things I learned the other day watching a PBS Nature special. Every time a woodpecker’s bill hits the wood, up to 20 times a second face first knocking, the force is 20 times a boxer’s knockout punch.1 The force Woodpeckers can withstand the force of the constant blows against their face essentially because the muscles around their skulls retract back to absorb the force of the blows while their incredibly long and muscular tongues go back and wrap up and around the skull to cushion it! And some woodpeckers even have an inner [&hellip

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by: Allen Shaw Birds, birds, birds. They come in all shapes and sizes. They range in type from carnivores to herbivores. Birds have been the stars of their own movies. Birds have taught children the importance of personality over looks. Some are even the leaders of nations. Is it any wonder that bird watching is one of the world’s most practiced hobbies. People from all walks of life enjoy bird watching. Anyone can do it. All it requires is patience, a pair of binoculars and most importantly, a bird feeder. And there are many types. Depending what birds you want to attract will determine what kind of feeder to get. Hummingbird feeders are the most popular and come in two styles; inverted and basin style. [&hellip

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I watched for an hour and a half and this was my official count: 5 House Finches (2 males, 3 females) 3 Dark-Eyed Juncos 2 Red-Breasted Nuthatches 2 Downy Woodpeckers (One male, one female) 5 Chestnut-backed Chickadees A dozen or more Black-Capped Chickadees 1 Stellar’s Jay 5 American Robins (1 male, 4 females) 3 dozen or more Mallards 1 – 2 dozen American Crows 4 Song Sparrows 3 Spotted Towhees

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We added an arm to the bird feeder on the back porch and then added a suet case. This has attracted a few new birds. We will try to get photographs of them sometime soon. However, one regular visitor now is the downy woodpecker. He hangs out for long periods of time, pecking away at the suet. How adorable! =) They are similar to the pileated woodpecker (think woody wood pecker) but they don’t have the red tuft and are much smaller. The downy woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. It likes to eat insects, larvae, eggs, sunflower seeds and suet from backyard feeders. They are found throughout Washington State year-round. Lucky us! =) We have since added another post about the Downy [&hellip

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Ha-ha-ha-ha-hahahahaha… woody woodpecker was fashioned after today’s bird, the Pileated Woodpecker. He’s sooooo cute. It is about the size of the crow which is actually large for a woodpecker. I wouldn’t have thought they’d be so small really. I don’t know why. Maybe I watched too many cartoons growing up and not enough birds in the trees. These woodpeckers peck at the wood to get sap and ants. Interestingly enough, they peck square holes in the trees. They peck so hard, they can break smaller trees. And the holes they peck into trees often become homes for smaller birds. The Pileated Woodpecker likes my neck of the woods, the Pacific Northwest, lucky me! =) Listen to the pileated woodpecker here (Source: Cornell Lab of Ornithology). [&hellip

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